Cohort 1

Carol Bristol

A member of the MARC program from 1998 to 2000. She graduated with a B.S. in Psychology in September, 2000. While at Brooklyn College she spent two years in the laboratory of Dr Kathleen Axen studying the effects of diet on diabetes risk, particularly the metabolic effects of high - vs.- low fat diets in rats. Carol was a recipient of a Brooklyn College Academic Honors Scholarship. Carol presented posters at Research Day at Brooklyn College ("Development of a Model of Hyperfattyacidemia in Normal Rats for the Study of Islet Secretory Function") and at the National Minority Research Symposium ("Diet-Induced Hyperfattyacidemia"). She also presented at  the 2000 Leadership Alliance Conference in Virginia on "Metabolic effects of High-fat vs. Low-Fat Diets in Rats"). In the spring of 2003 Carol graduated with in a Masters in Public Health from George Washington University in Washington, DC. She is currently working for an international development consulting firm called Chemonics International.  Her job entails technical, contractual, and financial project management of projects in health. She has also developed tools and provided HIV/AIDS technical input for HIV/AIDS integration activities and knowledge sharing across the company.

Richard Clare

A member of the Brooklyn College MARC program between 1998 and 2000. He graduated with a B.S. in Health & Nutrition Sciences in September, 2000. During his time in the MARC program, he worked with Professor Anthony Sclafani, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, on  research in the field of feeding behavior. Richard presented posters on his research on taste preference response in rats to the new sweetener Splendra ("The Preference for Sucralose in Rats: Some Like it, Some Don't") at the 2000 Brooklyn College Science Research Day where he was an award winner for undergraduate research, and at the National Minority Research Symposium in November, 1999 ("Internalization of Thrombin Receptors is Low in SF9 Cells"). This latter presentation was based on research done as an intern at Schering-Plough Research Institute with Dr Carolyn Foster as part of the Leadership Alliance Early Identification Program. He also presented at an in-house presentation at Schering-Plough that summer. At the 2000 Leadership Alliance meeting he presented a poster on "Increased Protein Preference and Acceptance in Rats Fed a Protein-Free Diet"). While at Brooklyn College, Richard was the recipient of the full tuition Rose Goldstein Memorial Scholarship. Before entering the MARC program, he did a summer research project with Dr. Phyllis Gootman in the Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Pediatrics at SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn. He received an MPH from SUNY Health Science Center at SUNY Downstate Medical Canter.  He also spent time as a Public Health Intern at the Arthur Ashe Foundation.  He is currently enrolled in New York College of Osteopathic Medicine where he is recieving training to be an osteopathic physician.

James Frenel

A MARC student between 1998 and 2000. He graduated with a B.A. in Chemistry in February, 2001. During his time in the MARC program, James worked in the laboratory of Dr. Lesley Davenport of the Chemistry Department. He presented posters on this work at a Brooklyn College Science Research Day ("Isolation and Purification of Alkaline Phosphatase from E. Coli") and at the 2000 Leadership Alliance Summer Symposium ("Effect of Protein Conformation on the Binding of a Fluorescent Ligand to Bovine Serum Albumin"). In the summer of 1999, James did a summer research externship with Dr. Terry Turner, in the Department of Urology and Cell Biology, at the University of Virginia School of Medicine doing research on sprematogenesis. James presented the results of this research at the 1999 National Minority Research Symposium in Phoenix. The work with Dr. Turner was also presented at several meetings on which James' name appeared ("Physiological compartmentalization of the epididymal interstitium: A role in segmental function of the epididymal tubule" at the Eleventh European Testis Workshop, St. Malo, France, 2000, and "Interstitital segmentation of the rat epididymis: A role in tubule function", published in the abstracts of the 35th Annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction in Madison Wisconsin.  In 2000 he presented "Effects of Protein Conformation on the Binding of a Fluorescent Ligand to Bovine Serum Albumin" at the Brooklyn College Science Research Day. After graduation, James worked in the pharmeceutical industry, first at a small company on Long Island, and then at Pfizer. He received his MS in Industrial Pharmeceuticals from  Long Island University.

Martin Wakeland

A member of the MARC program from 1998 to 2000. He graduated from Brooklyn College with a B.S. in Psychology in 2001. While in the program, he worked with Professor Israel Abramov who does research on the physiology of the human visual system. Martin's research involved the measurement of the summation of responses from each eye in the human visual system, specifically binocular summation above threshold. He presented a poster on this research ("Suprathreshold Binocular Contrast Summation") at the 1999 annual meeting of the Society for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in Florida. He has also presented posters on this work ("Vision: Binocular Contrast Summation") at the 1999 National Minority Research Symposium in Phoenix, and at the 2000 Leadership Alliance summer symposium in Virginia and the annual Brooklyn College Science Research Day. Upon completion, he began teaching science at John J. Pershing  Intermediate School in Brooklyn. Martin is also a talented poet; in 2001, Martin had an anthology of his poetry, Bright Sunrise into Midnight published by Vantage Press.