Honors, Awards and Grants

Our faculty are not only superb teachers, they are active scholars in their fields of expertise. In addition to the more than $10 million in research grants the Brooklyn College faculty obtained over the past year, many of them garnered accolades and distinctions in their respective fields. Below are some examples of the accolades bestowed upon our talented faculty.

  • Louis S. Asekoff, English, was selected by Poet Laureate Philip Levine to receive one of the two 2012 Witter Bynner Fellowships. A professor in the Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing, Asekoff received the $10,000 fellowship from the Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry.
  • Kathleen Axen, Health and Nutrition Sciences, is pursuing her studies of the metabolic effects of very low carbohydrate weight-reduction diets on obese rates under a $471,000 four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health.
  • Jennifer Basil, Biology, is among the 300 best professors in the country, according to the newest book from The Princeton Review. The Best 300 Professors presents the inspiring and challenging educators who make the most impact on students' lives. The 300 were chosen from an initial list of 42,000 professors out of the 1.8 million postsecondary teachers instructing students at colleges and universities across the country.
  • Rebecca Boger, Earth and Environmental Sciences, received a grant from the University of Alaska for $62,000 to monitor the seasons through global learning communications.
  • Doug Boyer, Anthropology and Archaeology, received the CUNY Junior Faculty Research Award in Science and Engineering (J-FRASE) that will allow him to build a database of bones and share that information with researchers around the world. The J-FRASE is a new, $50,000 grant for up-and-coming professors to help them advance their research in life science, physical science, mathematics or engineering and to bolster their ability to attract other external funding. He is one of only three recipients of this year’s inaugural awards.
  • Brett Branco, Earth and Environmental Sciences, received a grant from Loyola University – Chicago to study the impact of oyster restoration on nitrogen cycling in the Hudson-Raritan estuary. 
  • Stacey E. Brenner-Moyer, Chemistry, was awarded the National Science Foundation's 2012 Faculty Early Career Development grant for junior faculty to continue her research in developing nonmetal catalysts, a relatively new area of chemical research. One of the foundation's most prestigious awards, the Faculty Early Career Development Program offers a monetary incentive of $450,000 in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.
  • Maria Contel, with the help of a $467,860 three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, has been working with gold compounds to create an alternative cancer therapy that is less toxic than platinum-based compounds, which have been used since the 1970s.
  • Scott Dexter, Computer and Information Science, is part of a collaborative research project on linear algebra in new environments under a $72,613 National Science Foundation grant.
  • Under a $467,860 three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, Laura Juszczak, Chemistry, is the principal investigator in a research project that is studying tryptophan, an amino acid that can assist in the detection of certain abnormalities and diseases in the human body. 
  • The newest novel by Ben Lerner, English, Leaving the Atocha Station, was bestowed The VII Annual Believer Book Award. Leaving the Atocha Station was named one of the best novels of 2011 by The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, The New Republic and The Kansas City Star. Lerner was the winner of the 2011 Preis für International Poesie der Stadt Münster, an award the city of Münster, Germany, bestows every two years to the best volume of poetry translated into German. It was the first time an American earned this distinction.
  • Peter Lipke, Biology, has obtained funding from Biothera, Inc., to develop a proprietary strain of common baker's yeast with enhanced properties.
  • Juergen Polle, Biology, and Roberto Sánchez-Delgado, Chemistry, are sharing a $900,000 three-year grant from the Department of Energy to study alternative energy sources. Polle received an additional $800,000 grant from the Department of Energy to advance his search for species of algae that yield more oil at a minimum cost.
  • Funded by a $396,369 four-year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Luis Quadri, Biology, is the principal investigator of a project to develop new antibiotics to combat pathogenic bacteria that may be used as agents of bioterrorism.
  • Theodore Raphan, Computer and Information Science, has received a National Science Foundation grant to study motion sickness vulnerability and remedies.
  • Alfred Rosenberger, Anthropology and Archaeology, is using a $15,000 National Geographic grant to continue his investigation about primates in the Caribbean.
  • Thanks to a $680,000 four-year NIH-SCORE grant and a $100,000 two-year PRF-ACS grant, Roberto Sánchez-Delgado, Chemistry, has continued his research on the use of ruthenium to increase the efficiency in chloroquine to fight against the agent that causes malaria.
  • Elizabeth Sklar, Computer and Information Science, has been awarded $345,000 by the National Science Foundation to provide undergraduate students first-hand experience with multi-agent and multi-robot systems.
  • With a $500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, Barbara Studamire, Biology, is analyzing interactions between retroviral and host proteins. Her research will help design benign targeting viruses as well as anti-HIV, anti-oncogenic and other retroviral drugs.
  • Ned Sublette, Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, received $20,000 from the University of Southern California – Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, the highest stipend awarded for the Knight Luce Fellowship for Reporting on Global Religion. The fellowship annually plucks seven journalists to report on the impact of religion around the world. Sublette will be traveling to Angola and Haiti starting this summer to report on how indigenous religions are reflected in music.